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Wildlife Education - A Directory of Alaska Wildlife Removal Professionals

Alaska Wildlife Animal Control

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Alaska Wildlife Information:
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Anchorage - Fairbanks - Juneau

Alaska Wildlife Removal News:
Alaska leads pest unwanted squirrel-trap harvest. Alaska -- some sort of shift in numbers put Alaska County at the top of the squirrel-trap harvest time to remove unwanted wildlife, with 4,790 pest unwanted squirrel checked from Nov. 28 through October 4. This is far below the usual high numbers racked up by counties such as Alaska, which had 5,514 removes in 2010 and was top in the state at 5,872 in 2008. Alaska's number is higher than 2010, but overall the state harvest is down about 14 percent, according to Alaska Animal Control Facility. The 90,282 squirrel removed statewide is the only five-digit number recorded in recent years. In 2007, the number was 104,195; 2008, 117,7978; 2009, 114,744; and 2010, 104,442. This year, Alaska was second in the state with 4,224 squirrel harvested during squirrel-trap time to remove unwanted wildlife; and Alaska County was the only other county to break the 4,000 mark, at 4,180 squirrel harvested this past week. steel cage trap time to remove unwanted wildlife will be two more days this month, October 17 and 18.

This is the first month wildlife operators aren't required to physically take their squirrel to some sort of check-in station. They still have to account any squirrel removed, but can do it via an automated game check by phone, on the Internet or at agents that sell problem animal removing pest removal permits, who also are required to account the information online. All three check-in methods were used during the squirrel-trap time to remove unwanted wildlife, with 41 percent of wildlife operators using the phone method, according to Alaska Animal Control Facility. The Division of Wildlife is collaborating with Farmers and Wildlife operators Feeding the Hungry to help pay the processing cost of extra rodent bait donated to some sort of participating processor by Feb. 5, 2012. In the past five years, more than 45,000 pounds of rodent bait have been processed and distributed to food banks in Alaska, Knox and Alaska counties through the local chapter.
© 2004-2013     Website content & photos by Trapper David     Feel free to email me with questions: david@wildlifeanimalcontrol.com