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How to use one-way exclusion funnels to remove bats

Nowadays, since human settlements have spread to almost every corner of the planet and since we are forced to co-exist with the wildlife that naturally inhabits those places, it shouldn’t be a complete surprise that one day, your home, or attic could potentially become a habitat for some of these wildlife creatures such as bats.

In that case, removal by trained professionals should be one’s best option. There are a number of ways to remove the bats, but among the safest and most efficient is the removal by using a one-way exclusion funnel to permanently exclude the bats from your building. There are a couple of things to consider when using this method, and if possible, it should be done by a licensed team of wildlife removal crew that specialize in bat removal, since the lack of attention to any detail could cause the removal to be in vain.



Firstly, it is important to find and identify all the entrance holes used by bats to get into your building, these could range from all shapes and sizes but are mostly small in diameter since small Brown Bats are the most common bats that take up buildings as their habitats. Once that is done, the next step is to properly and firmly seal off each and every hole so that they can’t use them again.

Once this is done, a custom crafted, one-way exclusion funnel can be placed in a fitting spot that will serve as a way for bats to get out. It should be crafted accordingly to the size of the bats infesting the building, since over-sizing it will cause problems and allow them to come back in. Once the funnel is in place, a time period of 5 or more days should be given, this will allow for sufficient time for all the bats to be excluded from the building, and with the inability to come back, they will simply relocate to another area, preferably using some roost at a greater distance from your premises. Keep in mind however, that extra time might be necessary depending on the type and number of bats infesting the location, bear that in mind and plan accordingly. Only remove the exclusion funnel once you are sure that all the bats are gone.

After the completed actions, clean out the place from any waste and make sure there are no remaining holes through which some other creatures could sneak in and cause problems in the future. By following these methods, you should be well on your way of getting rid of the bats infesting your home, but don’t forget to treat the work with caution and approach it safely. Go back to the How to get rid of bats home page.

If you need bats help, click my Nationwide list of bats removal experts for a pro near you.

© 2001-2017     Website content & photos by Trapper David     Feel free to email me with questions: david@wildlifeanimalcontrol.com