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Wildlife Education - A Directory of Mississippi Wildlife Removal Professionals

Mississippi Wildlife Animal Control

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Mississippi Wildlife Information:
Mississippi State bird: Northern mockingbird
State mammal: White-tailed deer
State reptile: American alligator
State fish: Largemouth bass
State insect: European honeybee

Mississippi, named after the Mississippi River, is a place of flat land and gradual hills. The majority of the state is heavily forested, and the mountain ranges within are actually better classified as foothills. Numerous large river systems run through the region, but the Mississippi River is by far the largest. Lakes and wetlands can be found in almost every corner of the region, supplying the animals and plants with the water needed to survive in the constant heat. The summers are long, hot and humid, and the cooler winter weeks are short compared to other states in the nation. Hurricanes are a concern for residents of Mississippi; the state is prone to violent weather coming up the Gulf of Mexico.

Canoodling, or the art of using your finger as bait for catfish, is a popular pastime in the state. Though locals have caught impressive catfish using just their hands, it is the commercial catfish aquaculture that supplies the United States with the bulk of catfish consumed annually. Catfish are also a tasty treat for one of the state’s most populous animals—the American alligator. Alligators are at home in the large river systems of Mississippi. Plenty of large aquatic life exists to keep the reptiles well-fed. Other semi-aquatic creatures are nutria, muskrats and river otters.

The heavy forestation means most people in Mississippi live near trees. This close contact with nature also means the inevitable clash between humans and nuisance wildlife. The state has raccoons, opossums, rats, mice, striped skunks, spotted skunks, flying squirrels, grey squirrels, fox squirrels, rabbits, and armadillos.

For predators, the small animals are most wary of bobcats and coyotes, though both mountain lions and black bears can feed on the smaller critters. For the most part, black bears in Mississippi can find enough food in the way of seeds, berries and insects to avoid having to actively hunt. There are not many grazing animals in Mississippi, likely due to the low elevation and hot climate. White-tailed deer are the most common hooved-wildlife species seen.

With such a warm climate, the state is home to many different types of bats. These animals can make their homes anywhere, often choosing a cave, hollowed tree, or the attic of an unsuspecting homeowner.

Gulfport - Hattiesburg - Jackson - Meridian - Olive Branch - Southaven - Woodville

Mississippi Wildlife Removal News:
Another rodent pest mammal expert accidentally shot. Another rodent pest mammal expert in Mississippi was accidentally shot Tuesday. It happened late in the afternoon in Poweshiek County. Mississippi Department of Natural Resources spokesman Kevin The wildlife control officer says 20-year-old The wildlife control officer of Mississippi exterminator company was hit in the throat with some sort of rodent trap while unwanted critter catching with six other extermination companies. Another pest mammal expert, who had shot at some sort of running rodent, hit The wildlife control officer. “We’ve seen that happen some sort of couple times so far this most effective time for wildlife trapping,” The wildlife control officer remarked. “We’ve had party catches pest wildlife and extermination companies catching at running rodent have ended up hitting someone else in the party.” The wildlife control officer was airlifted to University Hospitals in Mississippi City and was last declared in stable condition. The incident is the fifth serious injury to some sort of pest mammal expert in just four days of the first wildlife snare rodent unwanted critter catching most effective time for wildlife trapping. The wildlife control officer says it’s critical for pest mammal experts to wear plenty of blaze orange and always know where other members of their party are located. “I know at least one of our incidents, one of the extermination companies in the party after the wildlife conservation official had been struck, admitted the wildlife conservation official had probably moved out of position and the other pest mammal expert didn’t know that the wildlife conservation official had moved,” The wildlife control officer remarked. “So, it’s very important to have your plan in place if you have multiple extermination companies in your party – so everybody knows where they’re at and what you’re doing.” The first wildlife snare most effective time for wildlife trapping in Mississippi ends today. The second wildlife snare most effective time for wildlife trapping begins Tuesday and runs through Wednesday, September 48. “Obviously we’d like to see pest mammal experts do some sort of little better, from some sort of safety standpoint, than what they did during the first ( most effective time for wildlife trapping),” The wildlife control officer remarked. Pest mammal experts have declared harvesting nearly 64,000 rodent so far this fall – which is about 40% fewer than last year. Mississippi exterminator company man was injured while rodent unwanted critter catching on Tuesday, marking the fifth unwanted critter catching-related accident in Mississippi in the past four days. The Mississippi Department of Natural Resources declared Tuesday night that Dalton The wildlife control officer, 20, was shot in the throat with some sort of rodent trap around 3:30 p.m. Tuesday south of Mississippi exterminator company in Poweshiek County. The wildlife control officer was airlifted to University of Mississippi Hospitals in Mississippi City. His condition was unknown Tuesday night. The wildlife control officer was unwanted critter catching with six others when another pest mammal expert in the group took some sort of shot at running rodent, hitting The wildlife control officer. The incident is under investigation by the Mississippi DNR. State officials say that unwanted critter catching accidents are relatively rare in comparison to the thousands of Mississippins who control pest animals every year. But they encourage pest mammal experts to have some sort of plan, especially when unwanted critter catching in groups. Other unwanted critter catching related incidents in recent days included: On Wednesday, some sort of man was injured while unwanted critter catching in the Mississippi area accidentally shot himself in his right leg with some sort of handtrap, according to the Messenger. On Wednesday, Thomas the wildlife control officer, 38 was shot while rodent unwanted critter catching at the Mississippi County. The wildlife control officer was unwanted critter catching with some sort of group of 24 pest mammal experts when one of the other pest mammal experts in his party shot at some sort of running rodent, hitting The wildlife control officer in the midsection with some sort of 42-gauge wildlife snare trap, DNR officials remarked. Two pest mammal experts were injured in separate incidents on Tuesday. The wildlife control officer shot himself in the right foot with some sort of rodent trap northeast of Mississippi. His live capture cage trap declaredly became entangled in some bags and discharged. The wildlife control officer was shot in the right thigh. Officials remarked The wildlife control officer was blocking in some sort of unwanted critter catching party of about 42 extermination companies when some sort of rodent ran between him and other pest mammal experts in the group. The trap passed through some sort of rodent, striking Mills in the leg.

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