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What are the most common types of animals that live in attics?

Everyone has heard the adage that your home is your castle. If you have a home with an attic, whether you live in the country or the city, you run the risk of critters taking over your attic space. Almost any animal will take advantage of a warm space that is close to food and water and safe from the elements and most predators. There are, however, a few animals that are normally associated with attic trespassers than others. Here is a short list of our furry friends that want to call your attic home. Tree squirrels love to run climb, and jump. They will use your roof as a jungle gym practicing their acrobatics, and leaping into trees from its convenient peak. Moving into your comfy attic is perfect for these bushy tailed beasts because of its approximate location. Your attic space keeps them high in the air and out of the elements.



Bats find attics to be the paramount place to set up their maternity communities, with more than enough dry space to birth and raise their young, tucked safely away from predators and the weather. Colonies of bats will also choose lofty attic spaces because of their ability to provide a safe, dark and spacious place to roost during the day. Rats and mice love to find a cavernous attic space in which to house their quickly growing communities.

Once established in your attic, the walls and air vents become their superhighways allowing them access to the rest of your home where they will find ample food and water to sustain the whole pack for years if left undisturbed. In the late spring female raccoons set out in search of maternity wards to birth and raise their young. You attic will fit the bill nicely. The mother raccoon can leave on short hunting trips assured that her young will stay dry and warm, far away from the grip of most predators. Although the list of attic interlopers goes on, these are the most common candidates. The next you hear things that go bump in the night, check your attic first for unwanted visitors! Go back to the How to get rid of wildlife home page.

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