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How to find and remove snakes in your attic

Snakes tend to live in places that are enclosed or in a place they can find food. Snakes that live in the attics are usually the climbing snakes such as the Yellow Rat Snake. These kinds of snake are not venomous, but the terror alone is enough to get you going in the opposite direction. However, running in this case isn’t going to help you. So, it is better that you get rid of the snake before its lay eggs and then you see numerous baby snakes running around in your attics.



Rats are known for making their home in attics. Once you see a rat in your attics, the next thing you will see a snake following it. As rats leave a distinct odor and the snake follows that smell in order to catch the rat. Like rats, snakes also have the ability to fit in tiny holes, so they will follow their prey no matter where it goes. Keep in mind, the snake will live in your attics until it can find food there. One way to get rid of snakes in the attics is remove the thing that is bringing it back in the first place. You get rid of the rats the snake will go elsewhere in search of food. Below we have listed some tips that will help you identify whether you have a snake in the attics and if you do than how to get rid of it.

Noises:
People tend to hear noises in their attics when nobody is up there. They say they hear slithering sort of noise.

Evidence:
The snake leaves its skin wherever it makes home. So, in-case you think that the noises are caused by rats, you can always look for the skin that is left behind by the snake.

Time:
Unlike some snakes that come during the rainy season, climbing snakes are up and about around the year. However, they are more active during the warm weather.

Techniques to remove them:
In old times, people use to use ammonia or mothballs in order to get the snake leave. They even used ultrasonic sounds or strobe to scary it away, but it seems the modern snakes have become intelligent. They have learned how to tackle these things. You no longer can use the conventional methods to get rid of them. So, your best shot is to get rid of the rat smell, in short, get rid of all the rats in your attics.

Once done the next step is to seal all the small holes that are present in your attics in order to prevent penetration of more rats, followed by snakes.

You can also use the snake traps inside your attics. They have worked very well for many. Go back to the How to get rid of snakes home page.

If you need snake help, click my Nationwide list of snakes removal experts for a pro near you.

Reader with snake in attic: Came across your website recently. Saw that you said you had never personally heard a snake in the attic, so you couldn't say what they sound like. Just thought I would share my experience, it may help. I live in West Ga. near the U. of West Ga. I have about 9 acres of property surrounded on almost all sides with old and new trees. Sandy, loony soil. Creek on property feeds into Little Tallapoosa River. Tons of wildlife and birds. Rodents of all sorts, fox, deer, opossum, raccoons, water fowl, hawks, etc. Many rat snakes, and the occasional corn snake. Water mocossins nearby due to a marshy, wet area on back of property. Rat snakes always in the wellhouse, they come and go. I let them be. However, this wet summer the year after my cat died in the winter of 2013, I've had a snake lurking around the house. I see him slither into the ivy when I'm cutting grass. The part I do see is black, so I think he's either a black rat or a racer snake. He's long, thin and rather fast when he wants to be. He got into my attic somehow on the second story. My house is old and parts are cedar siding. I think he got in through or near the chimney. He slithers, and when he's hunting and moving quickly up in the attic, you know it us a snake. No mistaking that creepy sound right above you, especially when he's a large one. The can make thumping sounds as they move and clunk part of their bodies against something, or as the move under insulation. What alerted me, in the late spring, to his presence was the sound of scratching, by a mouse, and then the sound of...well, like an octopus arm, slithering and gathering up his prey in his coils. The smell is bad, like a nasty odor all of a sudden in a room, and when he's on the move, he stirs up dust. It smells like someone shook out an old rug full of dust inside an upstairs bedroom. At times, during the night or late afternoon, I will hear a loud bang, like someone has struck the ceiling with a golf club one time. I don't know, but assume he's striking at a possible mouse. Needless to say, this is freaking me out since I've never experienced this before. I've checked everywhere, but no snake. I've got so many sticky traps everywhere, it is starting to just be funny. Me vs. Snake. So, I called, yes called, the man who makes Caba Snake Traps and paid about 80 bucks for the biggest one they had. I put it near the fireplace, outside, where I thought he might be entering from ground level. I slipped the huge sticky thing inside and waited. About a week later, I found the huge trap pushed away in a diagonal manner from the wall of my foundation with half the sticky part of the trap stuck to the top edge of the trap and flopping out if the trap , damp from all the rain, with leaves stuck on it, and the other half still inside the trap with nothing on it. That must be one powerful, long snake to get out of that trap. Anyway, so much for the 80.00 bucks. Usually, in Ga. In the summer, nothing can stay alive in an attic around here what with the heat. But our mild summer and monsoon like rains have changed the patterns of animals around here. Anyway, I am now mustering up the courage to take my poisons, my additional traps, and my pellet rifle into the attic. Do you think I should also paint my face blue, like in Braveheart? Happy hunting.

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